10 Good Luck Foods for the New Year

December 14, 2011

Get in good graces with karma, prosperity and fortune this year with New Year's dishes that say lucky in every language.

Five-Spice Soba NoodlesPork Loin with Roasted Pears and ShallotsCitrus Golden Ring CakeQuick Lentil SoupBraised Savoy Cabbage RollsSteamed Wild Salmon with Mustard GreensEast-West Black-Eyed PeasCollard Green SaladSour Cream Raisin PieHam with Orange and Stone-Ground Mustard
The Chinese don't celebrate their New Year's until January 23rd. But when they do, it is an all-out celebration! Ring in the day properly with a classic Asian noodle bowl, and be sure to keep those noodles long, it's a sign of good luck to come! Recipe: Five-Spice Soba Noodles
Pork is a popular meat for New Year's in several countries because of pigs' association with wealth, plumpness and forward thinking (they dig forward with their snouts). Our porcine 'loin will serve up luck in tasty style. Recipe: Pork Loin with Roasted Pears and Shallots
Ring cakes are New Year's classics because their circular shape signifies the completion of the year that is ending and the one just beginning. Some cultures bake a coin or trinket in the cake and believe whoever gets the lucky slice will have good fortune all year long. Recipe: Citrus Golden Ring Cake
In Brazil, little lentils represent prosperity and are traditionally served during the first meal of the year. We adore our quick and easy lentil-packed soup, sure to bring good Brazilian karma. Recipe: Quick Lentil Soup
Germans and Swedes place their luck in leafy cabbage. The in-season green has endless preparation possibilities from soups to sides. We love the leaves stuffed with ground beef and quinoa. Note: Although our recipe calls for turkey, winged-foul is a no no on New Years. You don't want luck to fly away! Recipe: Braised Savoy Cabbage Rolls
Salmon is typically served in America's North West for New Year's, and like pigs, the swimmer symbolizes luck. Some say it it because fish swim forward (and some salmon even upstream!) while others say it's due to their abundance when they travel in schools. Recipe: Steamed Wild Salmon with Mustard Greens
Black-eyed peas have been considered lucky in the South since the Civil War. Legend has it the two-toned bean saved a starving Mississippi town with its protein-packed staying power. Here we've taken the tradition global with an unusual toss of black-eyed peas seasoned with miso and chipotle. Recipe: East-West Black-Eyed Peas
Wishing for a little moolah this year? Then collard greens are the way to go. Southerners consider the hearty greens good luck for their resemblance to folded money. We love how they make us rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber. Recipe: Collard Green Salad
The Spanish and Portuguese believe eating 12 grapes or raisins in the time it takes the clock to strike 12 times at midnight will bring good luck for the upcoming year. We are honoring this tradition with a raisin pie - sure to be gobbled down just as quickly. Recipe: Sour Cream Raisin Pie
If pork isn't popular amongst your friends, celebrate the prosperous pig in the form of this glazed ham. Topped with golden raisins and stone-ground mustard, our ham is great for New Year's Eve or brunch the following morning. Recipe: Ham with Orange and Stone-Ground Mustard
The Chinese don't celebrate their New Year's until January 23rd. But when they do, it is an all-out celebration! Ring in the day properly with a classic Asian noodle bowl, and be sure to keep those noodles long, it's a sign of good luck to come!


Recipe:  Five-Spice Soba NoodlesPork is a popular meat for New Year's in several countries because of pigs' association with wealth, plumpness and forward thinking (they dig forward with their snouts). Our porcine 'loin will serve up luck in tasty style.


Recipe:  Pork Loin with Roasted Pears and ShallotsRing cakes are New Year's classics because their circular shape signifies the completion of the year that is ending and the one just beginning. Some cultures bake a coin or trinket in the cake and believe whoever gets the lucky slice will have good fortune all year long.



Recipe:  Citrus Golden Ring CakeIn Brazil, little lentils represent prosperity and are traditionally served during the first meal of the year. We adore our quick and easy lentil-packed soup, sure to bring good Brazilian karma.


Recipe:  Quick Lentil SoupGermans and Swedes place their luck in leafy cabbage. The in-season green has endless preparation possibilities from soups to sides. We love the leaves stuffed with ground beef and quinoa. Note: Although our recipe calls for turkey, winged-foul is a no no on New Years. You don't want luck to fly away!


Recipe:  Braised Savoy Cabbage RollsSalmon is typically served in America's North West for New Year's, and like pigs, the swimmer symbolizes luck. Some say it it because fish swim forward (and some salmon even upstream!) while others say it's due to their abundance when they travel in schools.  


Recipe:  Steamed Wild Salmon with Mustard GreensBlack-eyed peas have been considered lucky in the South since the Civil War. Legend has it the two-toned bean saved a starving Mississippi town with its protein-packed staying power. Here we've taken the tradition global with an unusual toss of black-eyed peas seasoned with miso and chipotle.


Recipe:  East-West Black-Eyed PeasWishing for a little moolah this year? Then collard greens are the way to go. Southerners consider the hearty greens good luck for their resemblance to folded money. We love how they make us rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber.


Recipe:  Collard Green SaladThe Spanish and Portuguese believe eating 12 grapes or raisins in the time it takes the clock to strike 12 times at midnight will bring good luck for the upcoming year. We are honoring this tradition with a raisin pie - sure to be gobbled down just as quickly.



Recipe:  Sour Cream Raisin PieIf pork isn't popular amongst your friends, celebrate the prosperous pig in the form of this glazed ham. Topped with golden raisins and stone-ground mustard, our ham is great for New Year's Eve or brunch the following morning.


Recipe:   Ham with Orange and Stone-Ground Mustard
Mark Boughton/ styling: Teresa BlackburnMark Boughton/ styling: Teresa BlackburnMark Boughton/ styling: Teresa BlackburnMark Boughton/ styling: Teresa BlackburnMark Boughton/ styling: Teresa BlackburnMark Boughton/ styling: Teresa BlackburnMark Boughton/ styling: Teresa BlackburnMark Boughton/ styling: Teresa BlackburnMark Boughton/ styling: Teresa BlackburnMark Boughton/ styling: Teresa Blackburn
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